Bird & Bird Data Protection training amongst the first to gain prestigious CNIL approval in France

21 June 2012

The Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL), the French Data Protection Authority, in their article dated 20 June 2012, has named Bird & Bird partner Ariane Mole as one of the first four approved Data Protection trainers in France.


Ariane, who jointly heads Bird & Bird's international data protection practice, spent seven years at the CNIL advising on international issues and then worked as a data protection expert with the European Commission for two years, before joining the firm. She now advises leading French and international clients on all aspects of personal data protection and privacy, including international compliance across jurisdictions. She has already been recognised as a legal expert by the E.U. Commission's EuroPriSe project, enabling her to provide EuroPriSe privacy certification at European level.


The CNIL recognition lasts for the next three years. Applicants wishing to obtain a seal were required to fill out a form including a description of the relevant product or procedure and information on how it satisfied the CNIL’s requirements. The CNIL had two months from the date it received applications to test the product or procedure for compliance and make a decision about whether to grant CNIL approval. Decisions were made during the CNIL’s plenary sessions on 14 June 2012.
 
A CNIL representative said: "The CNIL recognition allows companies to differentiate themselves and highlights the quality of their services. For clients/attendees, it is a confidence indicator in the products or procedures awarded by the CNIL that is of use while identifying and selecting companies compliant with data protection principles."


Ariane Mole said: "I am delighted that the quality of our training has been recognised by this honour from the CNIL. As the volume and complexity of information being used by businesses grows, data protection is an increasingly important issue. Fines and penalties can be very substantial and the reputational damage can also be significant. The best way of protecting businesses against these threats is to ensure every individual across the organisation understands the obligation to keep sensitive information safe and to protect privacy. Providing training is the best way of achieving this. So being able to show we deliver the highest possible quality of training is a major boost and will give our clients the reassurance they need."